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LMSS Masthead

Periodicals with LMS content

BackTrack

BackTrack which is edited by LMS Society Member, Mike Blakemore and which contains items of LMS interest in each issue now has its own web-site where details of the current and past issues can be found.


Recent and Coming soon:

June and July 2015 - Vol.29/6 and 7: - The Bolton-Blackburn line 1845-1858 by Jeffrey Wells

June 2015 - Vol.29/6 - The Furness Railway 'Cleator' Tanks by Michael Peascod

July 2015 - Vol.29/7 - The 'North Atlantic' Coaches of the LMS/NCC by Colm Flanagan

April, June and August 2015 - Vol.29/4, 6 and 8 - The Development of Railways to the North West of Scotland by Peter Tatlow

October 2015 - Vol.29/10 - The Railways of Keighley by David Joy

November and December 2015 - Vol.29/11 and 12 - The Formative Years of the Lancaster & Carlisle Railway by Jeffrey Wells


An index of LMS related articles in volumes 1 to 28 of Backtrack can be found here.



There is also an independant web-site which publishes an index for BackTrack.


LMS Review

This new publication again edited by LMS Society Founder Member, Bob Essery, will look at all aspects of the LMS in both prototype and model. Details can be found on the LMS Review web-site.


LMS Journal

Publication of the LMS Journal edited by LMS Society Founder Member, Bob Essery, has ceased with Issue 38. Details of all issues can be found on its LMS Society hosted web-site.


Others

There are of course other periodicals which regularly carry LMS related content. Their respective editors are more than welcome to forward details of such via the Hon. Secretary for publication on this page.

Recent LMS Related Publications

While the Society is happy to list any book with LMS content here, such a listing cannot be construed as an endorsement of any book by the Society. Where the author is member of the Society they are identified as such.

The Dingwall & Skye Railway - a pictorial record of the line to Kyle of Lochalsh

Peter Tatlow - an LMS Society member.

The Dingwall & Skye Railway

ISBN 9 781906 537 46 3 Crecy Publishing Ltd, 2016

The Dingwall and Skye Railway was in 1870 the first line, north of Glasgow, to reach the west coast of Scotland and is still the most northerly. In the first instance it opened only to Stromeferry on Loch Carron. In 1897 it was extended to the Kyle of Lochalsh, opposite the Isle of Skye. At over 63 miles it is the longest branch line in Great Britain. Threatened with closure during the Beaching era, it was reprieved by the traffic generated in connection with the construction of a concrete platform for the off-shore oil industry. Thereafter vigorous campaigning by local government and the community has secured its ongoing operation, thereby continuing to provide one of the most dramatic and picturesque rail journeys in the country.

With over sixty years of personal experience of the line, the author describes the difficulties of construction through mountainous terrain and along rocky coasts, the challenges of rival and competitive schemes, and the operation of the line over the years; together with a look at the short branch line to the spa village of Strathpeffer. The impact on the remote scattered communities and the means of access to the Hebrides are explored with the changes over the years.

200 photographs and around fifty drawings and diagrams provide the pictorial aspect of this most magnificent of tourist routes.

Caledonian Railway 956 Class

Donald Peddle.

ISBN 9 781911 038 05 4 Lightmoor Press 2016.

Designed at St Rollox to work, without assistance, the heaviest passenger trains on the company's principal routes of Glasgow to Carlisle and Aberdeen, the '956' Class would be required to haul 425 ton loads, as well as operating at 75-80 mph to maintain the booked timetable.

For the class of four locomotives, out-shopped in 1921, three-cylinder propulsion, using a novel 2:1 derived motion for the centre cylinder was chosen, this being associated with a large boiler. Unaccountably, a number of recognised technical imperatives, well established with earlier classes, were neglected. Initial trials results were disappointing, difficulties being found with both the steaming capabilities and with the novel valve gear, which was subject to two major redesigns, with little obvious improvement.

Caledonian Railway Carriages

Mike Williams.

CR Carriages

ISBN 9 789811 038 00 9 Lightmoor Press 2015 360pp

The latest title to be published jointly by the Caledonian Railway Association and Lightmoor Press is the long-awaited book which describes the carriages owned and operated by the Caledonian Railway from its opening until the 1923 Grouping.

The topics covered include the CR's reaction to technological developments in railway passenger transport and the increasing attention paid to passenger comfort and convenience. The evolution of its carriage livery with challenges some aspects of 'received wisdom.' It also deals with furnishing and internal decor. The classes of stock are covered by reviewing the general service stock to the end of McIntosh's tenure in 1914, the down-rated carriages acquired from the West Coast Joint Stock fleet, the Pullman cars and the final designs in the Pickersgill regime. The CR ambulance train and other carriages in war-time service are described along with vehicles which were not part of general service stock. Saloons, Invalid carriages, Post Office vehicles, the prison van, Inchture horse bus and the Connel Ferry rail motor are all covered along with some proposed designs that never saw service, including a steam rail motor.

The book comprises 360 pages of text and illustrations, 275 mm. by 215 mm., printed on gloss art paper with colour laminated printed board covers and is lavishly illustrated with some 250 photographs and over 300 drawings. Appendices give information about the number of carriages in the fleet, carriage orders and building dates and list the available drawings of carriages and components, with their Archive location.

The Stafford & Uttoxeter Railway

Allan C. Baker & Mike G. Fell.

ISBN 9 781899 889 90 7 Lightmoor Press 2015 240pp.

The 121/2 mile Stafford & Uttoxeter Railway opened in 1867 and had running powers from Bromshall Junction into the North Staffordshire Railway station at Uttoxeter. At the other end of the line the S&UR, with the agreement of the L&NWR, accessed Stafford Station which was also used by NSR trains. The line spent most of its independent life in receivership, eventually being acquired by the enterprising Great Northern Railway in 1881. This book explores how that railway developed its relationship with the NSR over whose line it had to pass in order to reach its own metals at Egginton Junction. At the grouping of the railways in 1923, the GNR became part of the L&NER whereas the NSR and L&NWR became part of the LM&SR and so it was that Stafford and Uttoxeter continued to be locations where the trains and liveries of different railway companies rubbed shoulders. The narrative describes the personalities, operation and traffic of the S&UR, and examines the industries served by the railway, including the extensive salt works located at Stafford Common. The former S&UR lost its passenger service in 1939 but the line survived to become nationalised, the through link finally closing in 1951. The result of extensive and detailed primary research, the book is profusely illustrated and will appeal to railway enthusiasts and those who want to learn more about past commercial and industrial enterprise in the area in which they reside.

Stafford & Uttoxeter Railway

The Midland & Great Northern Joint Railway and its Locomotives

RJ Essery, an LMS Society member.

MGNJR Locos cover

ISBN 9 781899 889 37 2 Lightmoor Press 2015 240pp.

The Midland & Great Northern Joint Railway came into being in 1893, when the Eastern & Midlands Railway, having over extended itself financially, was jointly taken over by the Midland and Great Northern railways. The E&MR main line linked the Midlands and the North of England with the popular Norfolk coast resorts and its acquisition enabled these two railways to reach deep in to the heart of Great Eastern Railway territory. Following the joint takeover, the Midland assumed responsibility for the motive power whilst the GN looked after the signalling and permanent way. The line was run by a Joint Committee, the representatives of the MR and GNR giving way to those of the LM&'SR and L&NER after the 1923 Grouping. It was only when the line was ceded to the L&NER in 1936, however, that it began to lose its independent identity, with the locomotive department seeing the M&GN and ex-Midland types replaced by those of the L&NER and constituents. The locomotive history of the Midland Railway has been extensively covered by the author, in conjunction with the late David Jenkinson, in a four volume series published in the 1980s. At that time, it was intended to carry on and cover the locomotive histories of the London, Tilbury & Southend Railway, which came in to Midland hands in 1912, and of the two Joint lines which came under Midland control, the M&GN and the Somerset & Dorset Railway. The former came out in 2000 but the latter two lines still remained to be covered. This detailed profusely illustrated history of the Midland & Great Northern Railway, and in particular its motive power right from the very early days of the companies which grew to form it, therefore fills another important gap in the locomotive history of the Midland Railway. The text includes much new information which has come to light in the last twenty years, adding to the research previously carried out in the 1980s, whilst much of the illustrative content, including numerous detailed plans and a plethora of historic original photographs, has not previously been published. The majority of the M&GN system was closed in 1959 and, today, the only surviving section is that operated as a preserved line by the North Norfolk Railway, who do much to keep the memory of the old company alive. This volume is therefore a timely addition to the history of this most distinctive of railway's, which will be appreciated by enthusiasts, modellers and railway historians alike.

Signalling the Caledonian Railway

Jim Summers.

ISBN 9 781899 889 91 4 Lightmoor Press 2015 318pp.

The face of the Caledonian Railway was unmistakable, whether in the remote Highlands or the bustling industrial areas of central Scotland. Hitherto, studies of the railway have concentrated on its characteristic locomotives and rolling stock. For the first time, a volume is now devoted to the Caledonian infrastructure, in particular the signals, the telegraph pole routes and the signal boxes, which also distinguished the Caledonian scene. A close look with the sharp eye of the modeller is taken at these and their associated equipment. The signalling system existed to serve the traffic and so this book sets it in this wider context, recording how methods of controlling traffic evolved ingeniously to meet changing needs and discussing the men who devised and maintained it. A valuable chapter explains the organisation, and an explanation of the work of the operating staff is supplemented by John Paton's definitive essay on the architecture of their workplace, the signal box. Its development is charted by an unrivalled collection of photographs.

This story of how a great railway tackled safety and capacity is richly illustrated by historic photographs, which serve to throw a new and fascinating light on the Caledonian scene. Adherents of other railways who read this volume will find themselves looking at their own linesides with renewed interest, while admirers of the Caledonian will find much to sustain and enrich their passion.

Produced in association with the Caledonian Railway Association.

CR Signalling

Life on the Lickey: 1943-1986

Pat Wallace.

licky

ISBN 9 781858 585 23 9 Brewin Books 2014 160pp

For over forty years author Pat Wallace worked the Bromsgrove line, well known for the steep Lickey incline and the locomotives which helped the heavy trains to cope, including the famous Big Bertha. From engine cleaner to fireman and driver, Pat carefully records his career in a series of diaries which capture the daily routine and events of a railwayman's life as steam hauled trains gave way to diesels. Today the line awaits a new station and electrification. The book is complete with one hundred photographs of locomotives and rolling stock through the years.

Branch Lines of Strathearn - Tourists, Tatties and Trains

John Young.

ISBN 9 781899 889 88 4 Lightmoor Press 2014 296pp.

Sir Walter Scott once described Perthshire as 'the most varied and the most beautiful' county in Scotland. Within Perthshire, Strathearn fully merits this accolade, with Upper Strathearn renowned as a tourist destination, and the lower reaches being a rich agricultural area. For over a century, the branch lines of Strathearn were an integral part of this district.

This comprehensive history of those lines is the culmination of research over fifty years, drawing on many original documents and contemporary accounts. Lavishly illustrated with nearly 300 photographs, many never previously published, and over 200 other illustrations, it traces the development of these branch lines from the opening of the Crieff Junction Railway in 1856 to the closure of the last section of line in 1967. This book also details the part these railways played in the development of the district and the communities they served, including a chapter on Gleneagles Hotel, all of which will be of interest to the general reader as well as the railway enthusiast.

Produced in association with the Caledonian Railway Association.

strathearn

The North Staffordshire Railway in LMS Days: Volume 3

Basil Jeuda.

NorthStaffs3

ISBN 9 781899 889 83 9 Lightmoor Press 2014 184pp.

The third and final volume looking at what happened to the North Staffordshire Railway after it became a part of the LM&SR in the Railway Grouping of 1923. This was a period of great social, political and economic upheaval, from the General Strike of 1926, to the great depression of the early 1930s and ending with the Second World War. Shortly afterwards, the railways of the United Kingdom were Nationalised, which changed their appearance and the way they were run forever. This third book commences with a short introduction and takes a look at the road delivery operations in the North Staffordshire Section during the LM&SR era, as well as a brief mention of bus services. We then travel around the Loop Line, which is followed by a journey along the Biddulph Valley Line, both trips being interspersed with visits to the collieries and industrial concerns served en route. The next visit is to Stoke Works, to find out what happened to it under LM&SR ownership, after which we take a look at the fate of ex-NSR rolling stock once it had been subsumed into the LM&SR fleet. A detailed study of Stoke Round House and shed is followed by a look at locomotive allocations and use on the NS Section during the period and we then take a brief look at traffic control operations. Another detailed chapter then looks at what happened with the NSR's smaller canals and ends with a short synopsis of Rudyard Lake’s fall from grace under the LM&SR. Heading back out on to the rails again, we then travel the Leek Line from Stoke to Leek, from where we go up on to the Leek, Caldon & Waterhouses Branch and to the quarries at Caldon Low, to then finish our study of the LM&SR's North Staffordshire Section with a journey along the narrow gauge Leek & Manifold Valley Light Railway. Lavishly illustrated, with over 500 photographs, maps, tickets, posters, handbills, etc, much of it not previously published. Original research has again provided much new information for the text and captions. Basil Jeuda has written and lectured extensively on the NSR and the area it served for more than thirty years and, together, these three volumes now form an important illustrated history of the North Staffordshire Section of the London, Midland & Scottish Railway.

The Furness Railway - A History

Michael Andrews.

ISBN 9 780956 97 09 0 9 Barrai Books 2014 256pp.

When the Furness Railway became part of the London, Midland & Scottish system in 1923 it was a well known company serving the steelmaking and shipbuilding town and port of Barrow-in-Furness, the industrial and mining belt of West Cumberland and the southern part of the Lake District. Its main line ran from Carnforth on the main West Coast route of the London & North Western Railway to Whitehaven, a distance of 74 miles. It owned the Wennington- Carnforth line jointly with the Midland Railway and the Whitehaven to Moor Row, Rowrah and Marron Junction lines jointly with the LNWR. It operated steamers on Windermere and Coniston lakes and a large dock system at Barrow. In 1922 its capital exceeded £8m.

Its origin some 80 years before, was as an isolated single line of 14 route miles promoted by the principal Furness landowners, their associates and agents to bring down to the coast the slate from Kirkby Moor and the hematite iron ore from mines above Dalton, for shipment by sea to the Mersey, the Dee and the Severn. The original capital in 1844 was £100,000. In 1878, after tough negotiations with the LNWR, it obtained jointly with that company, ownership of the Whitehaven, Cleator & Egremont Railway and in 1879 it commenced working the main line traffic of the newly opened Cleator & Workington Junction Railway.

The story of the Furness Railway was not one of continuing prosperity as, towards the end of the 19th century, advances in steelmaking technology eliminated the supremacy of hematite iron which had been essential for the pioneering Bessemer steel process. The iron and steel industry of Furness and West Cumberland lurched from financial crisis to financial crisis. Barrow became more and more dependent on the shipbuilding industry founded in 1870 by railway and steelworks proprietors. The FR itself became increasingly expensive to operate as the Board of Trade introduced safer working practices. A second generation of railway managers developed the tourist traffic but profits continued to decline, the 10% dividends of the early 1870’s falling to around 3% from the turn of the century.

256 pages casebound fully illustrated with half tone and colour photographs and a range of maps and drawings from archive sources

furness

The Railways of Carnforth - the Town and its Ironworks

Philip Grosse.

carnforth

ISBN 9 780956 97 09 1 6 Barrai Books 2014 180pp.

This is a special edition publication to commemorate the tenth anniversary of the opening of the Carnforth Station Heritage Centre in 2003. This book provides a comprehensive history of the railways of Carnforth from the earliest days of railway development to the present day. Carnforth grew from a wayside halt on the L&C Railway into an important junction on the London to Glasgow main line with main lines to Leeds and Barrow in Furness. Carnforth's role as an important railway centre ended with the closure of the motive power depot and the exchange siding in 1969 and the removal of the mainline platforms in 1970, it eventually became an open station in 1988.

From 1860 Carnforth gradually became a significant railway town which rapidly expanded to house the three railway companies' workers. For nearly seventy years the Carnforth Haematite Iron Company produced high grade pig iron until it closed in 1929. It built an industrial village in the parish of Warton to house its workers. Parts of the classic film "Brief Encounter" were taken on the station during war time blackout and its connection to the film has enabled the derelict station to be regenerated as the Carnforth Station Heritage Centre.

The author has carefully researched and brought together a fascinating account of the railways, the township, and the ironworks and the making of the film at the station and in doing so drawn upon a wide range of material much of which has not previously been published. Fully illustrated with maps and drawings from archive sources together with half tone and colour photographs from the Cumbrian Railways Association, Rathbone and other individuals collections.

Highland Railway Carriages and Wagons

Peter Tatlow, an LMS Society member.

ISBN 9 781909 328 13 6 Noodle Books 2014 200pp plus index.

Highland Railway Carriages and Wagons is a totally new book and the first time the rolling stock of the HR has been subject to such close scrutiny. Written by the renowned Peter Tatlow and produced in conjuction with the Highland Railway Society, this is a work that will appeal to all with an interest in rolling stock - probably regardless of company or period.

200 sides, heavily illustrated with copious drawings at 4mm to the foot make it a book that will be cherished. Casebound, 200 pages with full indexing. Printed on heavy art paper.

Highland CandW

Camden Goods Station Through time.

Peter Darley.

camden

ISBN 9 781445 622 04 0 Camden Railway Heritage Trust 2014.

The London & Birmingham Railway was the major project of its day, designed by Robert Stephenson, one of the great railway pioneers, who also supervised its construction and its opening in 1837. Camden Goods Station became the goods terminus and Euston Station the passenger terminus. For a few years trains were hauled by rope from Euston up the incline to Camden before the intensification of both passenger and goods services rendered such technology obsolete.

The L&BR left a strong footprint on the landscape from Euston to Camden Town and Primrose Hill. The story moves from rapid economic growth to eventual decline and then to the recent regeneration. The historic features around the former Goods station are providing the basis of Camden's transformation through its markets, media, music, food and entertainment into a global brand. Join Peter Darley in unfolding this story from 1837 to the present day.

A fascinating selection of 200 images, photographs and drawings, published in February 2014, illustrating how some of London's most significant industrial heritage sites have changed in the course of almost two centuries.

Peter Darley is a leading figure in the Camden Railway Heritage Trust. He is a chartered engineer and lives in Primrose Hill. He conducts guided tours and gives talks on the area's industrial heritage.

Available from the Trust for £12.00 including postage. Payment by cheque to Peter Darley, 21 Oppidans Road, NW3 3AG or email Darleyp@aol.com regarding direct bank transfer
Or from all good bookshops (£14.99). All proceeds from sales go to Camden Railway Heritage Trust.

LMS Locomotive Review No.1 Passenger tender engines inherited from the former L&NWR

RJ Essery, an LMS Society member, and P Davis.

ISBN 9 781908 763 03 7 Wild Swan Publications 2013 160pp.

The question of what the LMS inherited from the constituent and subsidiary companies has often been considered in regular planning meetings for the LMS Journal. As far as we could see, the subject is not one to have commanded much attention from other authors and begs the question, what did the LMS inherit, how good was it and how long did it last before the new company replaced these assets?


This question could be directed to a variety of subjects ranging from fixed structures,signalling, livery, locomotives and rolling stock and even company identity, but we have chosen to begin our investigation with the largest constituent company of the LMS, the London & North Western Railway and to deal with its stock of locomotives. Self styled 'The Premier Line', it was formed in 1846 by the amalgamation of the London & Birmingham, Grand junction (an 1845 amalgamation of itself with the Liverpool & Manchester and several minor Lancashire companies) and Manchester & Birmingham Railways. When considering the L&NWR prior to the 1923 grouping, we must also consider the North London Railway, a line that was incorporated by an Act of 26th August 1846 as the East and West India Docks and Birmingham Junction Railway. In December 1908, an agreement to last twenty-one years was entered into between the North London and London & North Western Railway Companies to the effect that the North London would continue to exist as a separate corporation, but their senior officers would be retired and their places taken by the corresponding officers from the L&NWR.


There was also the Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway Company, the origins of which lay in a number of small lines that came together in 1847 assuming the title Lancashire &; Yorkshire Railway. Terms for amalgamation were agreed between the L&NW and L&Y in December 1921 and from 1st January 1922 the combined system was operated as one railway. For the purpose of this work, the locomotives of the Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway are excluded, but the locomotive stock of the North London Railway are included. Although it is not possible or even desirable to ignore the pre-1923 history, it is not intended to delve into the various aspects of LNWR locomotive history so beloved by some writers. The question of the suitability of Webb's designs, in particular his compounds, will not form part of this work; indeed the publisher and I take the view that the LMS inherited all manner of mechanical items from the constituent and subsidiary companies and, that the quality varied, but they became LMS stock, and the purpose of these books is to record, as objectively as possible, what it was and how it fared during the years that followed. Therefore, in many respects, this is a 'broad brush' approach and no attempt has been made to include every minor detail that affected every class of locomotives. Nevertheless, this illustrated survey has taken many pages, so we have divided it into three manageable volumes, the first covering passenger tender classes, the second the tank engine classes, and the third the goods tender engines.


The information in this work has been compiled from a number of sources, the majority of them secondary, and when crosschecking it became clear that not all the dates and facts quoted were identical. While every effort has been made to crosscheck them, the lack of prime source material means that information given may be at variance with other published works on the subject. There are many ways of interpreting historical fact and we hope this work will be seen as accurate and comprehensive and add to our knowledge of the story of LNWR locomotives during the post-1923 period.


The final point is addressed to those readers who are also railway modellers. Experience as editor and publisher of both LMS Journal and Midland Record has shown us that many readers use these titles as a source of reference and information for modelling projects, so accurate detail information is important to them, therefore we will try to be mindful of their needs.

LMS Loco Profile 1

THE CALEDONIAN, Scotland's Imperial Railway. A History.

David Ross.

CRHistory

ISBN 9 781840 335 84 2 Stenlake 2013 252pp.

The publishers believe this will become the definitive book about this famous railway and its history. It is the first full history of the Caledonian Railway ever to be published. Based on original source documents and contemporary newspapers and journals and fully referenced, it traces its development, through troubles both legal and commercial, as an operating railway and a business with its own distinctive style

Profusely illustrated, it is an essential book not only for those with an interest in the old railway companies and their often tumultuous relationships with each other, but for the light it sheds on Scottish society and commerce during the long high noon of industrialisation and growth.

This is a sumptuous, beautifully illustrated, hardbound volume stuffed with facts and information no railway enthusiast can afford to be without. Charting, as it does, the impact a single transport endeavour can have on the communities through which it passes and the industry which springs up in its wake, it is also of major interest to historians, archaeologists, sociologists and anyone who finds the industrial heritage of the British Isles of interest.

The book is also a work of art in itself.

Caledonian Railway Wagons and Non-Passenger Coaching Stock

Mike Williams.

ISBN 9 781899 889 74 7 Lightmoor Press 2013 320pp.

This is the first detailed history of the Caledonian Railway's wagons, from the opening of its first line in 1847 until the Company became a part of the LM&SR at Grouping in 1923. The research is based on Board minutes and other official sources, whilst over 250 official drawings have been examined. The introduction details the sources of information used and a chapter on the industrial development of Scotland outlines its influence on the size and diversity of the wagon fleet. The types of wagons and numbers in service are tabulated and the financial pressures which hamstrung the modernisation programme begun in the early 1900s are also described. An overview is offered of technical developments, which discusses how two Locomotive Superintendents transformed the wagon fleet.

The liveries of wagons and Non-Passenger Coaching Stock are next described, supplemented in each case by the systems used by the Caledonian to allocate running numbers. Photographic evidence and drawings depict a far more complex picture than that presented previously. Eleven chapters then deal with different types of wagons, ranging from those built by the thousand, to small numbers of wagons for special traffic. Building dates are given for each design, whilst design developments are described and supported by photographs and works drawings. Sample running numbers are included for modellers. A further chapter describes the Caledonian's relationship with the private traders who ran wagons over the system.

Appendices list the construction orders undertaken by the company and outside contractors. The surviving works drawings are listed, with their archive references, and the photographs in an official album dating from 1900 are described. A final appendix gives information about drawings for the modeller, supported by specially commissioned drawings of details characteristic of Caledonian wagons.

Produced in association with the Caledonian Railway Association.

CR Wagons

The North Staffordshire Railway in LMS Days: Volume 2

Basil Jeuda.

North Staffordshire 2

ISBN 9 781899 889 65 5 Lightmoor Press 2012 176pp.

The second of three volumes looking at what happened to the North Staffordshire Railway after it became a part of the LM&SR in the Railway Grouping of 1923. This was a period of great social, political and economic change and turmoil, which climaxed with the Second World War. Shortly afterwards, the railways of the United Kingdom were Nationalised, which changed their appearance and the way they were run forever.

This second volume begins with a short introduction, which includes essays on the decline in milk traffic and the promotion of Workmen's tickets in North Staffordshire. We then take a brief look at ex-NSR locomotives in Crewe Works, before journeying from there to Harecastle, followed by trips along the Sandbach Branch and the little known Macclesfield, Marple ∧ Bollington Railway. This is followed by a lengthy sojourn along the picturesque valley of the River Churnet, after which we return part way up the line to Rocester, to head off along the Ashbourne Branch and ultimately all the way to Buxton. Another long journey is then undertaken from Stoke to Derby, before returning a short way back to Tutbury to take the branch to Burton. Along all of these routes, brief stops are made to examine various industries and other aspects in more detail, such as the gypsum mines at Fauld, the Royal Ordnance Factory at Radway Green, minor branch lines such as that to Cheadle, or the various ex-NSR engine sheds encountered. This volume ends with a brief study of the operations of Railway Air Services Ltd, particularly in relation to Meir aerodrome at Stoke.

The volume is again profusely illustrated, with nearly 500 photographs, maps, tickets, posters, handbills, timetables and other material, much of it not previously published. Further original research has once more provided much new information for the text and captions. Basil Jeuda has written and lectured extensively on the NSR and the subsequent history of the area it covered for more than thirty years, and this seminal work is building into an important illustrated history of the North Staffordshire Section of the London, Midland & Scottish Railway.

The Somerset & Dorset Railway 1935-1966

Mike Arlett & David Lockett.

ISBN 9 781899 889 31 0 Lightmoor Press 2012 192pp.

Norman Lockett began taking black & white photographs in the 1930s, using glass plate negatives, a medium he preferred until the end of steam. A modest man, the vast majority of his output has never been published, despite its superb quality. Here, in the first volume of a series which will feature the pick of his work, we present over 200 highly evocative photographs of one of the best loved and most picturesque railway lines with which this country was once blessed - the S&D. Whilst Norman had his favourite 'spots' - such as the Midford Valley and Winsor Hill - he captured some of the lesser known parts, around Highbridge and the Bridgwater Branch, as well. He also looked for viewpoints not appreciated by others. In order to present Norman's work at its best, the publishers have returned to the original glass plates for the scanning process, rather than use his prints. This has revealed much extraneous detail which had been either lost in the printing process or simply cropped out altogether. Devotees of railway photography, S&D enthusiasts, railway historians and railway modellers will all find much to enjoy and of interest within these pages, with Norman's pictures being accompanied by a lively and knowledgeable text and captions, written by well known S&D authority Mike Arlett. There can be few railway photograph collections of this quality still largely unpublished, so this is a rare chance to appreciate the work of a largely 'unknown master'.

Produced in association with the Caledonian Railway Association.

Somerset and Dorset

The North Staffordshire Railway in LMS Days: Volume 1

Basil Jeuda.

North Staffordshire 1

ISBN 9 781899 889 48 3 Lightmoor Press 2012 160pp.

The first of three volumes looking at what happened to the North Staffordshire Railway after it was taken over by the LM&SR in 1923, up until 1947 when the LM&&SR was Nationalized. During this period, the country suffered the economic downturn of 1924 and a slump that lasted from 1929 until the late 1930s, which was then followed by the Second World War and its aftermath. This first volume covers the background to the establishment of the LM&SR and the demise of the NSR, the changing nature of industrial activity in North Staffordshire, the competition with road transport for passenger and freight traffic, and the impact of the Second World War. Separate chapters then follow the main line from Manchester and Macclesfield through Stoke to Colwich, including the Talke and Chesterton branches, connections to the factories of Michelin Tyres and Josiah Wedgwood, the Trentham Park Branch and ROF 5 Cold Meece. There is an introduction to the NSR canal system, which then goes on to follow the whole of the Trent & Mersey Canal, and there is a short section on the hotels of the NSR. This volume then concludes with a journey along the Stoke to Market Drayton line, which also includes diversions off on the Pool Dam and Apedale branches, the Newcastle-under-Lyme Canal, and the Audley Branch.

The book is profusely illustrated with over 400 pictures and several maps, whilst the author has also had access to many previously unpublished items of ephemera, including timetables, tickets and other material. The considerable text benefits from extensive research, that has yielded much new information. Basil Jeuda has written and lectured extensively on the NSR and the subsequent history of the area it covered for more than thirty years, and this is the first major work to be published on the North Staffordshire Section of the London, Midland & Scottish Railway.

The Wirral Railway and its Predecessors

T. B. Maund.

ISBN 9 781899 889 38 9 Lightmoor Press 2012 240pp.

The Wirral peninsula, which forms the top north west corner of Cheshire and sits between the rivers Dee and Mersey, is almost an island and, in many respects, exhibits the characteristics of a region isolated from other influences. This was undoubtedly even more pronounced in times gone past and is a feature that was particularly well illustrated in the development and 'look' of the railway company which served the most northerly and populated part of the peninsula - the Wirral Railway. The railway itself began in splendid isolation, with a branch from Birkenhead Docks to Hoylake, opened in 1866. From impecunious beginnings - the company was in receivership by the late 1860s and services ran only between Hoylake and Leasowe until 1872 - the Wirral system grew to become a busy commuter railway for the many people travelling over the Mersey to Liverpool, its tentacles eventually extending to West Kirby, New Brighton and Seacombe. Today, with the exception of the Seacombe Branch, the line remains in service as part of Merseyrail, carrying out the job it has always done.

This is the first comprehensive study of the railway's origins and its history as the Wirral Railway, followed by its later years under the LM&SR and British Railways, its operations, stations, locomotives, shed and works, and rolling stock. Its small locomotive fleet comprised entirely of tank engines and its independent nature is reflected in the fact that it was the first railway company in mainland Great Britain to run engines of the unusual 4-4-4 wheel arrangement. The goods traffic using the Wirral Railway is also studied in detail, including the industries, private sidings and wagons which connected to the system. Of particular note here is the highly lucrative working arrangement with the Great Central Railway, which allowed GC traffic to pass the short distance over Wirral metals from Bidston to Birkenhead Docks and which for many years generated a significant portion of the Company's profits. Wirral residents, both past and present, will obviously find much to enjoy here, whilst students of railway history will delight in delving into the machinations of one of the lesser lights of the British railway scene. Modellers, too, will find much to inspire them.

T.B. Maund has compiled what will now become the definitive history of the busy, independent minded Wirral Railway.

The Wirral Railway

Locomotive Modelling From Scratch and Etched Kits. Part 2

The Late Geoff. Holt.

Locomotive Modelling 2

ISBN 9 781908 763 05 1 Wild Swan Publications Ltd. 2013 136pp in full colour.

In view of Geoff's failing health, Wild Swan pulled out all the stops to publish this book as soon as possible but very sadly Geoff passed away before he saw the book. He was one of the country's finest loco modellers and this book, together with Volume One, will stand as a memorial to his outstanding talent.

Locomotive Modelling From Scratch and Etched Kits. Part 1

Geoff. Holt, an LMS Society member.

Locomotive Modelling 1

ISBN 9 781908 763 01 3 Wild Swan Publications Ltd. 2012 107pp in full colour.

A very user friendly, straightforward and encouraging book in which the author guides the reader through the techniques necesary for loco building, covering the two disciplines of kit- and scratch-building. As he doesn't feel there has been any appreciable difference in his approach from modelling in 4mm to 7mm and 10mm scales, the book should prove useful to everyone, but 7mm is the focus throughout these pages.

Ingeniously, Geoff has supported his text with a pair of signature rnodels whereby he tackles two engines of the same class, one scratchbuilt and the other kitbuilt, in order that the differing processes can be seen in direct comparison.

Wartime LMS

L. G. Warburton, an LMS Society member.

ISBN 9 781906 419 95 0 Noodle Books 2012 184pp plus index.

WARTIME LMS takes the story of the company from the build up and preparation to WW2, through the days of conflict and back to the difficult times that followed.

This is a learned tome, well illustrated of course, but one where the text carries the true story of each department of the railway including the men in charge of each, and how they prepared for and dealt with the running of the railway during the period.

Illustrated with contemporary material including fold out maps contained within a pocket at the rear.

Wartime LMS

LMS Power - The 'Coronation' Class

Edward Talbot.

LMS Power

ISBN 9 780954 278 75 5 Edward Talbot 2011 104pp.

The streamlined Pacifics of the London Midland & Scottish Railway were amongst the most outstanding of all British steam locomotives. Their style and design captured the imagination and set them apart from everyday engines. In the public mind they ranked equally with the streamlined 'A4' class of the London & North Eastern Railway, and when one was displayed at the New York World's Fair in 1939, they became famous all over the world, as one of a small number of elite streamlined designs along with the New York Central Rail Road's 'J3a' class Hudsons, and the Milwaukee Road's 'Hiawatha' Atlantics and Hudsons in the USA.

This new book is a celebration in photographs of these magnificent machines and will give pleasure to all their many admirers. It contains 96 pages with 160 black and white photographs, and 8 pages of colour, featuring superb paintings by Gerald Broom, Tom Connell and Barry G. Price.

It is a companion volume to The Coronation Scot, the Streamlined Era on the LMS, published in 2002, which described the train, the locomotives and the carriages, and the whole venture of the LMS into streamlining.

Railway Breakdown Cranes

The Story of Steam Breakdown Cranes on the Railways of Britain - Volume 1

Peter Tatlow, an LMS Society member.

ISBN 9 781906 419 69 1 Noodle Books 2012 256pp.

There are few railways subjects that have not been the subject of any number of books - but Breakdown Cranes is certainly one.

Renowned railway writer Peter Tatlow has spend several decades researching the history, origins, allocations, and work of these marvels of the mechanical age.

Part 1 in the series takes the story of the steam crane through from its earliest days to the start of the 'long-jib' variant, although many of the examples featured in this book were still active into the 1970s.

Illustrated in both b/w and colour complete with numerous drawings.

Cranes Vol 1

The Caledonian Railway Jumbos. The 18in. x 26in. 0-6-0s

H. J. Campbell Cornwell.

CR Jumbos

ISBN 9 781899 889 56 3 Lightmoor Press 2011 192pp.

This is a detailed study of the Caledonian Railway's 'Jumbo' 0-6-0s, officially the '18in x 26in x 5ft 0in Goods Engine', which were not only the workhorses of the Company but also formed the largest class of locomotives in Scotland. The 244 members of the class were built over a fourteen year period between 1883 and 1897, and many were also Westinghouse braked, whilst some were vacuum fitted as well, which thus allowed their extensive use on passenger traffic too.

With the aid of official plans and drawings, along with numerous mostly previously unpublished photographs, and in conjunction with technical specifications and other data, the author has faithfully documented the history, work, performance and allocations of these iconic little engines for posterity.

The entire class was taken over by the LM&SR at Grouping and most of them survived into the BR era, with the last four only being withdrawn in 1963, giving the 'Jumbo's a history of 80 years in total.

The book comprises 192 pages, 8 in colour, 275 mm. by 215 mm., printed on gloss art paper with colour laminated printed board covers and is lavishly illustrated with over 150 colour and B&W photographs covering the full life history of the class. The 50 plus official drawings and diagrams will prove invaluable to both modellers and historians and the many tables of analysis covering work and performance will allow many aspects to be studied in depth by the reader.

The Appendices include the full specification supplied to Neilson for their Works Order E561 and T56l, and individual engine histories, as extracted from the record cards, along with a full bibliography.

Published in conjunction with the Caledonian Railway Association.

Sir Ernest Lemon - A Biography

The production engineer who modernised the LMS railway and equipped the RAF for war

Terry Jenkins.

ISBN 9 780901 461 58 2 The Railway & Canal Historical Society 2011 272pp.

Ernest John Hutchings Lemon rose from the humblest beginnings to become a Vice-President of the LMS Railway. He was born in 1874, the son of a labourer in an obscure Dorset village, and a fortunate set of circumstances led to his apprenticeship at the North British Locomotive Company in Glasgow. In 1914 he joined the Midland Railway as Chief Wagon Inspector, soon rising to become Works Manager at Derby in the Carriage & Wagon Department. In association with 'Bob' Reid, he revolutionised the way wagons, and later carriages, were constructed, by introducing assembly-line techniques. Further promotions followed after 'grouping' in 1923, and in 1931 he was appointed Chief Mechanical Engineer of the LMS Railway - a post he held for less than a year before his appointment as Vice-President in 1932.

Throughout the 1930s he continued to overhaul the way the railway worked, seeking to eliminate old and inefficient practices. Lemon was one of the first proponents in this country of 'Scientific Management', a business philosophy first developed in the USA, and he introduced the principles to all phases of railway working and management.

In the summer of 1938, Lemon was seconded to the Air Ministry, as Director-General of Production, when the Government finally reacted to the charges of incompetence in the re-armament of the RAF. The programme had been dogged by controversy, monetary restrictions and delays, and the defence of this country still rested largely on obsolete aircraft. Production of the much-vaunted new generation of fighters had stagnated and was months behind schedule. The aggressive behaviour of Germany lent an even greater urgency to the situation, and Lemon was charged with the task of expediting and reorganising production. His reforms successfully enabled the programme to be completed ahead of schedule, and it was for this work that he was knighted.

When this country had to face the full might of German air attacks in the summer of 1940, the RAF was ready. The Battle of Britain was a close-fought affair, but the RAF did have sufficient aircraft - just! The story of the war in the air has been told in innumerable books. What is not so well-known is how the aircraft were produced in the quantities required - and the dynamism and urgency brought to the project by one man.

This book is the story of his life, both professional and private. The author has been fortunate to have had access to Lemon's own personal papers, and these - together with hitherto unknown archives discovered during research - shed new light on the management of the LMS at the time. This is especially true of the circumstances surrounding both Lemon's, and then Stanier's, appointments as CME and the importance of Sir Harold Hartley in the affair, which will cause many long-held views to be reassessed.

'The London Midland and Scottish Railway was one of the most important companies in Britain from its creation in 1923 to nationalisation in 1947. Lord Stamp, the President, is rightly cited as a key player in British business, but he was supported by very able managers. Ernest Lemon was one of the most capable engineer/managers of his generation, as evidenced by his role in the LMS as Vice-President; and, later, in the Air Ministry as Director-General of Production supporting Sir Wilfrid Freeman. This biography of Lemon is an important contribution to business and political history and tells the story of Lemon's career in both railways and aviation. It sheds light on an important player in British engineering, using important new archival material, to reveal a complex personality and the very human face of business and policy.' - Dr Roy Edwards, Southampton University School of Management, 2011

Sir Ernest Lemon

The Cathcart Circle

J. Kernahan.

Cathcart Circle

ISBN 9 781899 889 52 5 Lightmoor Press 2011 160pp.

The Cathcart Railway was opened in 1886, before most of the homes it now serves were built. With a length of eight miles from Glasgow Central to Glasgow Central, it was operated by the Caledonian Railway from opening until grouping. Jack Kernahan provides a history of the line from the first plans until the present day, including motive power and rolling stock, electrification, track layout and signalling, and the role of the line in popular folklore. The text has been thoroughly updated for this second edition, with additional appendices, photographs and plans.

The book comprises 160 pages. 275x215mm. Printed on gloss art paper, casebound with printed board covers.

Published in conjunction with the Caledonian Railway Association.

Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway Locomotives

Barry C. Lane, an LMS Society Member.

ISBN 9 781899 816 17 0 7 Pendragon Publishing 2010 182pp, 70 line drawings, 283 b/w and 13 colour photos. Hardback

While not being one of the major main lines in the country and never gaining a foothold in the capital, the Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway led the way with many developments in the design and construction of locomotives. Indeed, its final CME went on to occupy the same position in the LMS and the influences continued through to the standard steam locomotives of British Railways. The book catalogues the classes of all steam locomotives built at the railway's own works at Horwich and includes those bought in from manufacturers before 1889.

Profusely illustrated with photographs, many of which have never previously been published, along with engineering drawings and diagrams. This promises to be the definitive history of LYR locomotives.

Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway Locomotives

A Pictorial Record Of L. M. S. Signals

L. G. Warburton, an LMS Society Member.

LMS Signals

ISBN 9 781906 419 41 7 Noddle Books 2010 58pp. Softback

First published in 1972, this reference work on L.M.S. Signals is still held in high regard by all railway historians today and remains the definitive book on the subject. Up to that time, few books of this type had ever been produced, yet it set the scene for what would become the now expected detailed work on specific examples of railway history. Only 800 copies of the original book were produced and it has never been reprinted. Those few copies that do come on the market today command a high price, not just because of rarity value, but because of the expertise clearly demonstrated in its compilation. 38 years later, and long overdue, this is the very first paperback reprint of the original edition. With only a few minor corrections, the book remains 99% as per the original. It will be welcomed by those with an interest in signalling as well as anyone who appreciated a comprehensive and detailed railway work.

As per the original, it also contains a section on LMS Signal Boxes by the late V. R. Anderson who was also a Member of the LMS Society.

An Illustrated History Of LMS Wagons Vol. 1

R. J. Essery, ex-LMS Society President.

ISBN 9 781906 419 33 2 7 Noddle Books 2010 180pp, 174 line drawings, 349 b/w photos. Softback

The name Bob Essery will be familiar to nearly all railway enthusiasts and certainly anyone with an interest in either the LMS or rolling stock in general. Amongst the many classic works he has compiled is the popular series on LMS Wagons. First published in the 1980s and unavailable for some time, this new reprint is certain to take the market by storm. The book remains completely unchanged from the original; it comprises 188 pages on art paper with many hundreds of photographs and drawings examining this important subject. The depth and quality of the information included makes this one book no serious railway enthusiast will want to miss out on!

An Illustrated History Of LMS Wagons Vol. 1

Pullman Profile No 2 The 'K-Type' Cars

Antony M Ford.

Pullman Profile No 2

ISBN 9 781906 419 22 6 Noddle Books 2010 200pp inc. 24 page colour section.

For the second book in the 'Pullman Profile' series, Antony Ford takes as his theme the 'K-Type' Cars built in the 1920s. (Excluding the 'all-steel'veheicles.)

In this new volume Each inidividual car is described, its history, renamings (and there were often several) and demise are all examined in detail.

Interior and exterior views of numerous cars compliment a readable text split into individual chapters dealing with the varius batches of vehicles built, in the main, by just two specific manufacturers.

Tabular information and a section on the works at Preston Park are included.

200 pages on high quality art paper, casebound - landscape format, with copious illustations and plans.

The Midland & Great Northern Joint Railway and its Locos

R. J. Essery, ex-LMS Society President.

ISBN 9 781899 889 37 2 Lightmoor Press 2009 192pp.

The Midland & Great Northern Joint Railway came into being in 1893, when the Eastern & Midlands Railway, having over extended itself financially, was jointly taken over by the Midland and Great Northern railways. The E&MR main line linked the Midlands and the North of England with the popular Norfolk coast resorts and its acquisition enabled these two railways to reach deep in to the heart of Great Eastern Railway territory. Following the joint takeover, the Midland assumed responsibility for the motive power whilst the GN looked after the signalling and permanent way. The line was run by a Joint Committee, the representatives of the MR and GNR giving way to those of the LM&SR and L&NER after the 1923 Grouping. It was only when the line was ceded to the L&NER in 1936, however, that it began to lose its independent identity, with the locomotive department seeing the M&GN and ex-Midland types replaced by those of the L&NER and constituents. The locomotive history of the Midland Railway has been extensively covered by the author, in conjunction with the late David Jenkinson, in a four volume series published in the 1980s. At that time, it was intended to carry on and cover the locomotive histories of the London, Tilbury & Southend Railway, which came in to Midland hands in 1912, and of the two Joint lines which came under Midland control, the M&GN and the Somerset & Dorset Railway. The former came out in 2000 but the latter two lines still remained to be covered. This detailed profusely illustrated history of the Midland & Great Northern Railway, and in particular its motive power right from the very early days of the companies which grew to form it, therefore fills another important gap in the locomotive history of the Midland Railway. The text includes much new information which has come to light in the last twenty years, adding to the research previously carried out in the 1980s, whilst much of the illustrative content, including numerous detailed plans and a plethora of historic original photographs, has not previously been published. The majority of the M&GN system was closed in 1959 and, today, the only surviving section is that operated as a preserved line by the North Norfolk Railway, who do much to keep the memory of the old company alive. This volume is therefore a timely addition to the history of this most distinctive of railway's, which will be appreciated by enthusiasts, modellers and railway historians alike.

The book comprises 192 pages. 275x215mm. Printed on gloss art paper with colour laminated board covers.

MGNJR Locos

The Knotty - An Illustrated Survey of the North Staffordshire Railway

Basil Jeuda.

ISBN 9 781899 889 01 3 Lightmoor Press 2009 128pp.

A comprehensive photographic album of the North Staffordshire Railway with many previously unseen images and captions compiled by one of the recognised experts on the company. Sections on the locomotives, rolling stock, stations, canals, collieries, staff, signal boxes and other structures, provide a good overall picture of the NSR system.

The Knotty

LMS Lineside Part Two

V.R. Anderson & H.N. Twells, both LMS Society Members.

LMS Lineside 2

ISBN 9 781905 184 63 7 Wild Swan Publications 2009 104pp

An LMS Journal Handbook

This second look at the LMS lineside contains the following sections:

  • Railway signage
  • Timetable and Poster Boards
  • Platform Numbering
  • Station Seats
  • Barrows and Trolleys

Packed with illustrations this survey should prove invaluable to modellers.

An Introduction to Large-Lap Valves & Their Use on the LMS

Adrian Tester, an LMS Society Member.

Published by the author 2008 102pp Spiral bound with numerous diagrams and tables, including one separate fold-out diagram. Paper covers.

In the complex field of valves and valve gears, one of the less discussed areas is that of short or long-lap valves. In Britain, the Midland Railway's engineers had used short-lap valves, and were regarded as incompetent by no less an authority than the late E.S. Cox for adhering to them. But Cox and others within the LMS/Crewe establishment were long-lap valve men and used them. In this interesting and technical review of LMS practice, Adrian Tester comes to some interesting conclusions on the subject.

An Introduction to Large-Lap Valves

D.J.Norton's Pictorial Survey of Railways in the West Midlands

Bob Essery with contributions from John Edgington, both LMS Society members.

Railways in the West Midlands 1

Part One - LMS Western Division Lines ISBN 978 1 905184 50 7 Wild Swan Publications 2008 144pp

Railways in the West Midlands 2

Part Two - LMS Midland Division. Former Birmingham & Derby Junction Railway and later lines connecting to it ISBN 978 1 905184 51 4 Wild Swan Publications 2008 112pp

Railways in the West Midlands 3

Part Three - LMS Midland Division. Former Birmingham & Gloucester Railway and later lines connecting to it ISBN 978 1 905184 52 1 Wild Swan Publications 2008 112pp

The idea for these books emerged when the number and quality of pictures taken by D.J.Norton between 1947-1965 became apparent. However, it soon became clear that we could not confine the work to a single book so we have presented the story in three parts as a celebration of the work of D.J.Norton using pictures taken between 1947-1962 in the Midlands area centred upon his home city of Birmingham. I am delighted to have been able to edit the story and to acknowledge the considerable assistance I received from John Edgington who said, its only right this book should be put together by a couple of Brummies, although neither of us now live in Birmingham, whose motto is, once a Brummie always a Brummie.

Biographical Note.

D.J.Norton - Dennis John Norton - was born in Birmingham in March 1930. He developed an interest in railways early in his life and started photographing locos, stations and lines at the age of 17, just as British Railways were taking over from the 'Big Four'. His interest continued right up to his premature death as the result of an asthma attack in August 1965. Throughout this time his camera was primarily pointed at subjects related to the LMS Company. He held a lineside pass but his concept of 'lineside' seems at odds with what the authorities intended. Standing in the middle of main lines, walking through tunnels and even climbing signal posts were frequent activities. The result of all this disobedience is a collection of photographs containing many unique and unusual views.

He was a friend of many railwaymen, especially those working in signal boxes, places his wife recalls being taken whilst courting. Clearly he was recording the railway system for posterity.

Bob Essery.

Railwaymen of Cumbria Remembered

Peter Robinson, an LMS Society Member.

ISBN 978 0 9540232 6 3 Cumbrian Railways Association 2008 48pp

Cumbrian Railways Association publishes a Roll of Honour in remembrance of those who gave their lives in the service of their country during the Great War 1914-1918

The Cumbrian Railways Association has published a Roll of Honour to commemorate the railwaymen from Cumbria who gave their lives in the Great War between 1914 and 1918. Extensive research from war memorials, original documents, local newspapers and websites has revealed the names and service details of 234 men who died in the service of their country, mostly serving in the Army on the Western Front in France and Belgium, and others in many other parts of the world. The men are listed under the names of the twelve railway companies which operated in Cumbria at that time.

The Roll of Honour also reproduces moving reports from local newspapers of the Memorial Service to railwaymen held in Carlisle Cathedral in May 1919, and of the unveiling of railway company war memorials at Barrow-in-Furness and Maryport. Illustrated with contemporary and recent images and photographs, the Roll of Honour has been researched by the President of the Cumbrian Railways Association, Peter Robinson.

The Roll of Honour has been produced to mark the 90th anniversary of the Armistice which ended the great conflict of the First World War.

Available from selected local outlets (cost £5), or by post from CRA Publications, 19 Windsor Drive, Miskin, Pontyclun CF22 8SH (add £1 for post and packing).

Railwaymen of Cumbria Remembered

PULLMAN PROFILE No. 1: The 12-Wheel Cars

Antony M Ford.

Pullman Profile No 1

ISBN 9 781906 419 00 4 Noddle Books 2008 192pp inc. 16 page colour section

In this lavishly illustrated book, No. 1 in a series, here for the first time is the full record of the luxury British 12 Wheel Pullman cars (built between 1908-1923) which graced such celebrated pre-war trains as the 'Southern Belle' 'Harrogate Pullman' and 'Eastern Belle', and post-war the 'Bournemouth Belle' and Ocean Liner express.

"PULLMAN PROFILE NO. 1 The 12-WHEEL CARS" presents a fascinating, comprehensive and nostalgic record to the reader and captures an era when the familiar umber and cream Pullman cars flourished at a time when quality really did matter.

Nowadays, the Pullman Car Co is an enterprise that continues to attract a widespread following, not only from railway enthusiasts but also from those with a more general interest in by-gone luxury travel. This is scarcely surprising as Pullman was synonymous for superior accommodation and a high level of service.

Pullman recognised and appreciated the value of publicity - the inauguration of new services or even new vehicles provided them with opportunities to impress the media of the day. In these and other respects Pullman was unrivalled, yet in other ways it was conservative and restrained.

The 12 wheels cars introduced by the Caledonian Railway in 1914 and run under contract by Pullman on the LMS until 1934 (at which time they were incorporated into the LMS fleet of dining cars) are covered in some detail.

Authors and/or publishers of other LMS related books are welcome to forward details of such via the Hon. Secretary for publication on this page. . A copy (preferably a scan) of the dust jacket/front cover and the blurb would be appreciated.

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